Adversity on Purpose

 
Overcome adversityOnce again my inspiration comes from a tweetchat and once again that chat is #BeALeader (Thursdays @7pm ET). The topic last night was adversity and the conversation was focused on overcoming adversity and getting through tough times. We also recognized that adversity develops character and strengthens us.

This post is not about overcoming adversity but seeking it out, on purpose. The most successful among us do it all the time. Anyone who is fed up with their job and begins looking for a new one is choosing adversity, the interview process and the chance they won’t get the job. Yes, it’s true they might be replacing one adverse situation with a more promising adverse situation but make no mistake, they are seeking adversity.

Those who embrace the mantra, go big or go home, may fail big but they may also succeed big. Choosing adversity comes down to your risk tolerance. Is risk something to be feared or embraced? When I speak of risk I’m talking about educated, calculated, researched risk, the kind successful people take as opposed to the kind unsuccessful people take, foolish risk.

I have chosen adversity every time I’ve made an investment or started a business. I choose adversity when I attempt to overcome my phobias. We choose adversity every day we get out of bed even though we do all we can to minimize it. I’m all for minimizing and even avoiding adversity when possible, but I’m also ready to confront it when needed, are you?

When I began my latest What Next, opening a Hand and Stone Massage and Facial Spa, I knew I was choosing a difficult path. If it was easy everyone would do it but I, and the many others before me, believed we could triumph over whatever complication got in our way. I’ve had my doubts at times, but I did what anyone else who succeeds does, I found solutions rather than complaining about the problem.

Obstacles, adversity, and disappointment are a part of life and yes we grow stronger when we overcome these setbacks. Sometimes we even seek out adversity because we know what lies on the other side. Do you look at adversity this way? Why or why not? Please share.


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Recapping 2012 Part 7 of 7

 
2012 TimelineWell here it is, the end, the last day of 2012, and this is my last post looking back at the year. My next post will be looking forward. It’s important to know and understand the past but that’s only so you can plan your future. Going into 2013 I thought this post would be a good reminder that every decision you make has consequences so the sooner you make good decisions the better off you’ll be. Looking ahead means projecting several outcomes from each decision and deciding which is the most likely and which will serve you best. Here’s to taking the right combination of paths in 2013!

Action and Reaction

Early in our school lives we all learn about Issac Newton and his apple mishap that led to his theory of gravity. Well Newton also had some laws of motion and his third law of motion loosely states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Welcome to world of consequences. For every choice you make there is a choice (or several) that you did not make and every decision leads to a result, good or bad.

Consequences start at a young age. Things you have control over but often don’t have the maturity to appreciate, like the importance of good grades, for example. Once we move on to the next level in life we choose our major in college or career in life, and we would do well to choose wisely. How many people are willing to go into debt for an education that may not provide the means to easily pay back that debt? That one decision will have ripple effects throughout life.

How many people delay investing in their retirement accounts early in their working lives because they think they can’t afford it, because it will negatively affect their lifestyle? The fact is that their lifestyle will be much more adversely affected in old age if they wait too long. It’s not that they can’t afford it now, it’s that they won’t be able to afford it later.

Taking a What Next approach to decision making is to weigh as many options as feasible, and to choose carefully. Asking What Next means you have a long term outlook and understand the ramifications decisions have. In financial planning terms that means understanding the future value of a decision. Put simply, the future value of a dollar invested today at 10% interest is $1.10 one year later. The future value of not going into debt to fund your education is the ability to start saving earlier and building your retirement nest egg sooner.

I don’t have children but I think I might have spent more time talking about the consequences of that decision with Julie, than most people who do have children. I’m not sure I can think of a weightier decision than the choice to have children and yet I wonder how many people treat it with the reverence it deserves.

The everyday choices we face today will affect the life we have later. Buying a house, a car, toys, taking lavish vacations, all diminish your ability to save for the future. Whether you stay in your home for a long time or move frequently, whether you buy a new car every couple of years or hang onto it for a decade, will determine your level of success. It is a balance between now and then.

The question for you is, are you well balanced? (I know what some people say about me – so let the jokes begin) Do you have a long term outlook on life? Are you confident that your choices today will still look correct a year or five years from now?

Share some examples of long term decisions that have paid off for you and some that didn’t.


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Action and Reaction

 

Early in our school lives we all learn about Issac Newton and his apple mishap that led to his theory of gravity. Well Newton also had some laws of motion and his third law of motion loosely states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Welcome to world of consequences. For every choice you make there is a choice (or several) that you did not make and every decision leads to a result, good or bad.

Consequences start at a young age. Things you have control over but often don’t have the maturity to appreciate, like the importance of good grades, for example. Once we move on to the next level in life we choose our major in college or career in life, and we would do well to choose wisely. How many people are willing to go into debt for an education that may not provide the means to easily pay back that debt? That one decision will have ripple effects throughout life.

How many people delay investing in their retirement accounts early in their working lives because they think they can’t afford it, because it will negatively affect their lifestyle? The fact is that their lifestyle will be much more adversely affected in old age if they wait too long. It’s not that they can’t afford it now, it’s that they won’t be able to afford it later.

Taking a What Next approach to decision making is to weigh as many options as feasible, and to choose carefully. Asking What Next means you have a long term outlook and understand the ramifications decisions have. In financial planning terms that means understanding the future value of a decision. Put simply, the future value of a dollar invested today at 10% interest is $1.10 one year later. The future value of not going into debt to fund your education is the ability to start saving earlier and building your retirement nest egg sooner.

I don’t have children but I think I might have spent more time talking about the consequences of that decision with Julie, than most people who do have children. I’m not sure I can think of a weightier decision than the choice to have children and yet I wonder how many people treat it with the reverence it deserves.

The everyday choices we face today will affect the life we have later. Buying a house, a car, toys, taking lavish vacations, all diminish your ability to save for the future. Whether you stay in your home for a long time or move frequently, whether you buy a new car every couple of years or hang onto it for a decade, will determine your level of success. It is a balance between now and then.

The question for you is, are you well balanced? (I know what some people say about me – so let the jokes begin) Do you have a long term outlook on life? Are you confident that your choices today will still look correct a year or five years from now?

Share some examples of long term decisions that have paid off for you and some that didn’t.


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Rejection

 
A friend on Facebook posted a link to an article by Kathryn Stockett, author of The Help, where she chronicles the 60 rejection letters she received before finally being accepted by a literary agent who thought her book had potential. In What Next I point out that JK Rowling was turned down a dozen times before publishing Harry Potter. These examples are proof that success takes work, that you have to be tenacious.

I have taken a different route, though my goal, lots of book sales, is the same. Because I self-published, I have not gotten one single rejection letter. It would seem that I’ve taken the easy way out but nothing is further from the truth. I am on my own, responsible for all the marketing, all the public relations, all the sales. I have no help to sell a book written by a complete unknown that is easily lost among a crowd of similar books.

I had a choice, the main theme of What Next, and I chose a path that had certain benefits, no rejection letters, and certain obstacles, complete isolation in sales and marketing, but I knew the consequences of the decision when I made it. Some would say I should have tried to find an agent first then self-published, while others will think I did the right thing. I appreciate both opinions, but “what next” is very personal, and when it came down to it I made the choice that seemed best for me.

Now that I’ve said all that I’ll take whatever help you can give me in getting the word out about the book!


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