Trading Up

 
The headline today (May 2012) read “Housing Market Recovery Gains Traction.” I guess that’s a good thing. It’s certainly good for anyone trying to sell a house or hoping that it will at least be worth what they owe on it. I suspect we’ll see more of those stories as time goes on and eventually (probably not for a very long time) we’ll see that home prices have surpassed their 2006 peak.

Don’t get too excited because, human nature being what it is, I’m sure people will fall right back into the trap of bad habits.

I wrote the piece below for a previous blog I ran in March 2006 (before the collapse) about why owning a home is a danger for some people. As long as you don’t get caught in this trap, you’ll be fine.

Trading Up

My parents have owned the same house for more than 30 years. My cousin owned her home for 40 years, raised her children in it and one of those kids will probably live in that house after she’s gone.

Modest HomeHave you ever heard of a mortgage burning party? Well, it used to be that people would buy a house and live in it until they died, working year after year with one goal in mind, paying off the mortgage. When the day finally came and the mortgage was paid off the homeowner would burn the mortgage as a final act of freedom. It was a significant event.

This has become rare these days as people continue trading up to ever larger homes with more amenities that end up costing more to maintain. It’s theBig House common roadblock to wealth – status.

It’s not a conscious thing. We don’t wake up one morning and say “I’m going to put status over saving today.” But when it comes time to buy something major like a car, you probably want the newest model with the most amenities and biggest engine. If you could get a Mercedes or BMW you would.

It’s the same with a home. You’re probably going to stretch to afford the most you can and, in time, when your financial picture brightens and you’ve built up some equity, you’ll want to upgrade. Never mind that you already have rooms that are rarely used or that it will cost more to heat and cool the house. No, you want a bigger house so that you can impress friends and family. Like I said, this might not be a conscious decision but if you would just ask yourself the question “is it really necessary for me to move” you’ll be surprised at the answer.

We do this all the time. Do you really need that new DVD? Do you really need that new grill or would a bit of cleaning work just as well and save you hundreds of dollars?

Yeah little things add up but big things add up quicker. So stay in your current house a bit longer. Keep that car for a few years after you finish the payments. It may be a subconscious thing, seeking status, but you can make a conscious effort to fight that urge and do more by spending less.


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