A Crisis Isn’t A Crisis For Everyone

 

I read the news today, oh boy!

“Housing Crisis to End in 2012” the headline said. But my question to you is what housing crisis?

I’m not being stupid, I didn’t just crawl out from under a rock, and I didn’t have my head in the sand.

Actually here's my wife under a rock!

A crisis is only a crisis for those affected, for everyone else it’s not. My home lost value as did my rental properties, significant value compared to the overinflated heights of 2006, but is that a crisis? If I had to sell, maybe, but only if I owed more than the mortgage.

There is no doubt that a lot of people were very badly impacted by the housing market, were taken advantage of, made really bad decisions, had bad luck, or a combination of all of those. I’m not going to try to assign blame on a macro level, each situation is different.

Whether the housing crisis was or wasn’t a crisis for you, there are lessons to be learned, lessons in what next.

In yesterday’s post I wrote that there are consequences to every decision and that a What Next approach takes a long term view. That’s why financial planners suggest an emergency fund, liquid savings that can be accessed to pay your expenses in case of, well, an emergency.

BE CONSERVATIVE

The lesson from the housing crisis whether you emerged unscathed or not, is to be a little (or a lot) more conservative in your estimates. If buying a home is out of reach without serious stretching then delay the purchase.

The reality inherent in any major purchase is that you will have to give up one thing to achieve something else. Sometimes in order to afford the house you want, you’ll have to save more aggressively and that might mean foregoing that new car, or the boat you really want but can’t really afford, or the lifestyle that looks good but comes with a steep price.

HAVE A GOOD REASON

The second lesson from the housing crisis is to make decisions for the right reason. A house is a place to live, not a piggy bank and not a lottery ticket. Buy a home to live in. Having a good reason goes for other “assets” like a business, too. I’m on another journey, another scheme my wife calls it, to open a franchised business. She is asking the exact right questions; “for what purpose? How will we benefit and is the trade-off for that benefit worth it?”

STICK WITH YOUR PLAN

I have to admit that I don’t have compelling answers to those questions. We have a plan in place and we’re sticking with it. Sure, it can evolve, but it doesn’t have to. A lot of people got distracted by the ever increasing home prices and altered their plans. Not a smart move without a compelling reason. And prices keep going up isn’t a compelling reason.

LIVE BELOW YOUR MEANS

This really encompasses all of the previous lessons because if you are a little more conservative, wait until there is a good reason before making a move, and stick with your plan, you won’t be impulsive. A lack of discipline in spending is what leads a lot of people to live beyond their means. Living below your means is not a bad thing, it’s not a sacrifice, it’s really what everyone should be doing because it means you’re saving. If you live at your means that indicates to me that you aren’t saving any money.

It’s a shame that it took a crisis for people to learn these lessons, I just hope they stick this time.


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